scrap gold and silverGold Karat Chart

The measure of a karat (K) depends on the percentage of gold to added alloy metals. Each karat represents 1/24th of pure gold. Here is an explanation of the karats that shows the percentages:

  • 8K 33.3%, .333 Fine – This is the minimum karat that can be called “gold” in Mexico. You will almost never see this in the United States unless it was brought over.
  • 9K 37.5%, .375 Fine – This is a very popular karat gold in Ireland, and it is also the minimum karat that can be called “gold” in Canada. Same for this one.
  • 10K 41.7%, .417 Fine – This is the minimum karat that can be called “gold” in the United States.
  • 12K 50%, .500 Fine  – 12 karat was abolished in 1932 when the 14K standard was legalized, although some Black Hills gold is still manufactured in 12K.
  • 14K 58.3%, .585 Fine – 14 karat is the most popular karat gold sold in the United States.
  • 15K 62.5%, .625 Fine – 15 karat was abolished in 1932 when the 14K standard was legalized.
  • 18K 75%, .750 Fine – 18 karat is the most popular karat gold sold in Italy and other European countries.
  • 19.2K 80%, .800 Fine – This is a popular karatage in Portugal.
  • 20K 83.3%, .833 Fine – This is a very high karat gold notable for its bright yellow color.
  • 22K 91.6%, .916 Fine – This is another very high karat gold that is popular in Asia and which is very soft due to its small amount of strengthening alloys.
  • 23.76K 99%, .990 This is 99% pure gold, and is a popular karatage in Hong King, China, and elsewhere in Asia.
  • 24K 100%, 1000 Fine – This is pure gold, with no alloys added. Jewelry is made using pure 24K gold in Turkey, India, and Asia, but it is very soft, somewhat brassy in color, and more expensive.

 

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